Arthur Kay

VirtualBox – Accessing VirtualHosts from Guest OS

One of the reasons I started blogging was that I needed a place to archive all of the useful things I’ve found over the years. Blogging also allows me to share that information with the rest of the world.

I’ve had to figure this problem out several times now – it’s about time I simply write down the solution so that I can find it when I inevitably need to do this again. Continue reading

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Client-Side MVC, MVP and Testing

Last week at our Chicago Sencha Meetup Group, Chad Glendenin presented DeftJS. A lively discussion followed about why anyone might want to use DeftJS in place of the default MVC bindings that come bundled with Sencha Touch / ExtJS. Continue reading

Posted in ExtJs, JavaScript, Sencha Touch, Web Development | 1 Comment

Business Cards

Business cards are easily the best investment I’ve ever made as a freelancer and professional software developer.

A few years ago, I purchased 1000 business cards for my freelance business (aKa Web Design) for maybe $40. Although I’m not the world’s best graphic designer, I have been very happy with the quality and look of my cards.

That being said, I have learned a few things about business cards that I’d like to share before I create a new version. Continue reading

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Sencha in Chicago: Upcoming Events

I love community.

It’s been a little over a year since I started the Sencha Chicago User Group, and we already have more than 180 members (maybe 50 of whom are actively involved). We meet every month, talk software, drink beer and have a wonderful time!

Over the past few months, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting other software groups in the area – and there is some genuine interest in promoting ideas across our respective groups. This is probably the thing I love most about community – developers helping each other become better, exposing each other to new ideas. Continue reading

Posted in ExtJs, JavaScript, Sencha Touch, Web Development | Leave a comment

Sencha SDK Tools and Sencha Command

I presented this to the Sencha Chicago User Group last night… but since the slides don’t have all of context surrounding the usage, I wanted to expand upon them in a blog post. Continue reading

Posted in ExtJs, Sencha Touch | 3 Comments

#ThatConference: Summer Camp for Geeks

Apparently I’ve developed some serious JavaScript credibility in the Chicago-land area. I just found out that both of my sessions were accepted for ThatConference in August! The titles of my sessions are: Sencha Touch 101: Mobile Apps Built with HTML5 … Continue reading

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Book Review: Problem Solving and Programming Concepts

Disclosure: Pearson Education is a sponsor of the Chicago Sencha User Group, and they provide discount copies of of their books to our members. I have not been paid for this review, although I did receive this book for free. … Continue reading

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Book Review: The Node Beginner Book

One of my New Year’s resolutions for 2012 was to learn more Node.js… so I did a bit of Googling for good beginner’s resources, and I stumbled across The Node Beginner Book by Manuel Kiessling.

Considering the book’s title, I think the content is spot-on. Developers who are looking for an introduction to Node.js will find this book to be easy to understand, full of useful examples that are expanded in each chapter, and generally enlightening. Continue reading

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Building Apps with Sencha Touch 2

Last night at the Chicago Sencha User Group I presented a talk titled “Building Apps with Sencha Touch 2″. We had a really good turn out – about 40 RSVPs for the event (20-25 actually attended), making this by far our largest group to date!

Here are my slides. Continue reading

Posted in Chicago Ajax Developers, Sencha Touch, Web Development | 1 Comment

JavaScript Mergesort: Top-Down vs Bottom-Up

In my continuing series on JavaScript algorithms, I thought it might be fun to examine two methods for implementing “mergesort”.

Mergesort is essentially a “divide and conquer” technique, where the algorithm breaks an array into smaller pieces. Each of the small pieces is sorted and then recursively merged back together.

Mergesort is an attractive option for sorting large arrays because it is fast… and we’ll look at its efficiency in a moment. However, it also has a disadvantage: the algorithm requires more memory than Selection Sort and Insertion Sort, so for systems in which memory usage must be kept low mergesort may not be a good option. Continue reading

Posted in Algorithms, JavaScript | 1 Comment